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Chick Corea A Work In Progress Pdf 24 _HOT_



Cross Island National Wildlife Refuge is a complex of six islands (Cross, Scotch, Outer Double Head Shot, Inner Double Head Shot, Mink, Old Man Islands) encompassing 1,700 acres in Cutler. The six offshore islands are 10 miles southeast of Machias in Machias Bay. Cross, Mink, and Scotch Islands are covered predominantly by spruce-fir forest and support a variety of small mammals and songbirds, white-tailed deer, and osprey.\n Image Details \nBald Eagle bandedBald eagles currently nest on Cross, Mink and Outer Double Head Shot Islands. A large saltmarsh is located on the western end of Cross Island. During the fall, thousands of waterfowl, songbirds, shorebirds, and raptors pass through on their southward migration. The northern half of both Double Head Shot islands is dominated by spruce-fir forest, while the southern end of the islands are predominantly covered by grasses and shrubs. A variety of seabirds nest on both the islands. Old Man Island is one of only six nesting sites for razorbills in the United States and four of them are part of the Refuge. Vegetation on the island is sparse, with rock outcroppings, steep cliffs, and sea stacks dominating the island.\nAny islands supporting nesting eagles are closed to public access from February 15 to August 31.\nSeabird nesting islands supporting nesting terns, alcids, Leach\u2019s storm-petrel, or great cormorants are closed to public access during the seabird nesting season: April 1 to August 31. Islands supporting nesting gulls and common eiders are closed to public use from April 1 to July 31. Refuge staff monitor island resources and conduct biological surveys of the island\u2019s flora and fauna.\n ","main":true,"url":"\/refuge\/maine-coastal-islands-complex\/visit-us\/locations\/cross-island-national-wildlife-refuge"},"id":"10695","name":"Petit Manan National Wildlife Refuge","geodata":"value":"POINT (-67.8995726 44.4354257)","geo_type":"Point","lat":44.435425700000003,"lon":-67.899572599999999,"left":-67.899572599999999,"top":44.435425700000003,"right":-67.899572599999999,"bottom":44.435425700000003,"geohash":"drzsycjp179p4","latlon":"44.4354257,-67.8995726","summary":" (207) 546-2124 \n C\/O Maine Coastal Islands National Wildlife Refuge Complex\n14 Water Street\nMilbridge,\nME\n04658\n\n \n ","hours":" Petit Manan National Wildlife Refuge\u2019s has four mainland units and over 60 islands, stretching the entire coastline of Maine.\nMainland Divisions\n Image Details \nThe refuge's four mainland properties are located in Hancock and Washington counties. Upland areas are characterized by spruce-fir forests with some mixed hardwoods. The 2,178-acre Petit Manan Point Division, in Steuben, also includes jack pine stands, coastal raised heath peatlands, blueberry barrens, old hayfields, fresh and saltwater marshes, cedar swamps, granite shores, and cobble beaches. The Gouldsboro Bay Division, in Gouldsboro, protects 635 acres, including mature upland forest and a large tidal saltmarsh and mudflat. The 1,150-acre Sawyer's Marsh Division lies at the head of a broad saltmarsh in Milbridge, just north of Petit Manan Point. The recently acquired 431 acre Corea Heath Division, in Gouldsboro, protects a large, raised, coastal peatland and several populations of rare plants\nNeotropical migratory songbirds thrive in the forests of the mainland divisions. These birds breed in North America and winter in the Caribbean, Mexico, and Central and South America. Recently, populations of species such as the American redstart, Swainson's thrush, and song sparrow, have declined due to habitat loss throughout their migratory routes.\n Image Details \nThe saltmarshes and mudflats of the mainland divisions attract waterfowl, wading birds, and shorebirds.\nBlack ducks, great blue herons, and American bitterns ply the waters of the saltmarshes. Semipalmated sandpipers, dowitchers, greater and lesser yellowlegs, and dunlins probe the mudflats for invertebrates.\nDuring fall migration, 80-acre Cranberry Flowage on Petit Manan Point is filled with over 4,000 ducks. Black ducks, green-winged teal, and mallards rest and feed on wild rice in preparation for the long flight south. Long-tailed ducks, surf and white-winged scoters, common goldeneyes, and common eiders winter in coastal waters.\nThe former pastures and blueberry fields on Petit Manan Point provide nesting habitat for grassland birds such as bobolinks and savannah sparrows. In the spring, American woodcock use the clearings for their unique courtship displays. Whimbrels stop off here during their fall migration from the Arctic tundra to the southern United States. The Service maintains open areas through periodic mowing and controlled burning.\nIslands Image Details \nPetit Manan NWR includes 3,180 acres on 64 islands, stretching the entire coastline of Maine. The islands vary in size from 0.5 \u2013 1,312 acres. Eight of the islands are predominantly forested with mature stands of balsam fir and red spruce. Eleven of these islands currently support active bald eagle nests. While the other 53 islands within Petit Manan Refuge may provide some forested habitat, their primary resource value is to the open herbaceous habitat that provides valuable nesting habitat for a variety of seabirds. Refuge staff monitor island resources and conduct biological surveys of the islands\u2019 flora and fauna. Active seabird restoration projects are ongoing on Matinicus Rock, Petit Manan, Metinic and Ship\nSeabird nesting islands supporting nesting terns, alcids, Leach\u2019s storm-petrels, or great cormorants are closed to public access during the seabird nesting season: April 1 to August 31. Islands supporting nesting gulls and common eiders are closed to public use from April 1 to July 31. Islands supporting nesting bald eagles are closed to public access from February 15 to August 31.\n ","main":true,"url":"\/refuge\/maine-coastal-islands-complex\/visit-us\/locations\/petit-manan-national-wildlife-refuge","id":"10696","name":"Seal Island National Wildlife Refuge","geodata":"value":"POINT (-68.736191 43.8887805)","geo_type":"Point","lat":43.888780500000003,"lon":-68.736191000000005,"left":-68.736191000000005,"top":43.888780500000003,"right":-68.736191000000005,"bottom":43.888780500000003,"geohash":"drz1eveydttjm","latlon":"43.8887805,-68.736191","summary":" (207) 546-2124 \n C\/O Maine Coastal Islands National Wildlife Refuge Complex\n14 Water St\nMilbridge,\nME\n04658\n\n \n ","hours":" \u00a0Seal Island is closed to public access year round due to the presence of unexploded ordnance. \u00a0For more information, contact Refuge Manager at (207) 594-0600. Image Details \n\u00a0\nCommercial tour boats provide views of nesting seabirds and seals up and down the Maine coast. Check with the local Chamber of Commerce in Rockland for information on tour boats that may provide boat tours around Seal Island National Wildlife Refuge.\nSeal Island is one of the most important colonial seabird nesting islands in the Gulf of Maine.\u00a0 Boulder fields and ledges support a large colony of puffins, razorbills, black guillemots, and double-crested and great cormorants, grass\/ledge areas for terns, raspberry and grass thickets for common eiders, and peat\/glacial till substrate for Leach's storm-petrels. Seal Island is only one of five islands in Maine that host nesting great cormorants. The surrounding waters are rich with an abundance of food resources these birds depend on.\u00a0 The island is an important stopover for migrating songbirds, shorebirds and raptors. Image Details \nSeal Island is managed in cooperation with National Audubon Society and in 1970s successfully reintroduced Atlantic puffins to the island by transporting chicks from Newfoundland, Canada. Seal Island also supports one of the largest tern colonies in the Gulf of Maine, supporting over 2,100 pairs of Arctic and common terns. Each year Audubon and Refuge biologists collect information on seabird populations, food habits, and productivity, and work to control predators such as great back-backed and herring gulls.\u00a0Seal Island is vegetated with a variety of grasses and forbs interspersed with granitic ledge and rocks.\u00a0 Representative plant species include New York aster, beach pea, yarrow, raspberry, gooseberry, chickweed, shepherd's purse, creeping juniper, ragweed, and red fescue.\nThe Navy used the island as a bombing target from the 1940s until the early 1960s, the effects of the bombing and shelling can still be seen.\u00a0 Small craters and scarred granite are abundant, but the rank growth of grasses and raspberry has concealed most of the damage.\u00a0\u00a0\nSeal Island was listed on the State Register of Critical Areas in January 1976 for its unique value to nesting black guillemots and Leach's storm-petrels. At the time of designation, the island supported the largest petrel colony in the eastern United States with 2,000 pairs, and one of the largest black guillemot colonies, 200 pairs, in Maine.\u00a0 Image Details \nIn 2000, Seal Island was recognized as the largest gray seal pupping island in Maine.\u00a0 Harbor and gray\u00a0seals are common throughout the year. Fin, minke and humpback whales are sometimes seen in the surrounding waters. Minkes, like terns and puffins, feed primarily on small herring, and often come into the coves on the western side of the island.\n ","main":true,"url":"\/refuge\/maine-coastal-islands-complex\/visit-us\/locations\/seal-island-national-wildlife-refuge","id":"10697","name":"Franklin Island National Wildlife Refuge","geodata":"value":"POINT (-69.374239 43.8915477)","geo_type":"Point","lat":43.891547699999997,"lon":-69.374239000000003,"left":-69.374239000000003,"top":43.891547699999997,"right":-69.374239000000003,"bottom":43.891547699999997,"geohash":"dry9tq5nz1d07","latlon":"43.8915477,-69.374239","summary":" (207) 546-2124 \n C\/O Maine Coastal Islands National Wildlife Refuge Complex\n14 Water St\nMilbridge,\nME\n04658\n\n \n ","hours":" \u00a0 Image Details \n\u00a0\nThe U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service acquired the island in 1973 from the U.S. Coast Guard and established Franklin Island National Wildlife Refuge.\n\u00a0\u00a0 Image Details \nFranklin island was acquired by the U.S. Government in 1806 and the construction of the lighthouse was completed in 1808 for aids to navigation.\u00a0 The third established lighthouse on the coast of Maine, it marked the way for sailors form Pemaquid southwest to Thomaston and throughout Muscongus Bay.\u00a0 The U.S. Coast Guard manned the lighthouse for 160 year before automating it in 1967.\u00a0 The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service acquired the island in 1973 from the Coast Guard and established Franklin Island National Wildlife Refuge. The U.S. Coast Guard to this day still maintains the automated lighthouse tower aids to navigation.\nFranklin Island National Wildlife Refuge is a 12 acre island located in Muscongus Bay, six miles off shore from the Town of Friendship, in Knox County, Maine.\u00a0\u00a0 The island has a very acidic, organic duff soil layer over glaciated granite and schists.\u00a0 Maximum elevation is 35 feet, and the average tidal range around the island is nine feet.\u00a0 Covered with eight acres of spruce trees and four acres of raspberry thickets, rugosa rose, and various grasses and forbs the island once supported one of the largest common eider colonies in Maine.\nFranklin Island was listed on the State Register of Critical Areas in October 1977 for its unique value to nesting eiders.\u00a0 Registry Title is \"Franklin Island Eider Nesting Area\".\nUnfortunately the eider colony was decimated by avian cholera in the mid 1980\u2019s.\u00a0 Today osprey, herring, greater black-back gulls, black-crowned night heron, black guillemot, Leach\u2019s storm-petrel and a small population of eiders continue to nest on the island.\n ","main":true,"url":"\/refuge\/maine-coastal-islands-complex\/visit-us\/locations\/franklin-island-national-wildlife-refuge","id":"10698","name":"Pond Island National Wildlife Refuge","geodata":"value":"POINT (-69.770712 43.7394901)","geo_type":"Point","lat":43.739490099999998,"lon":-69.770712000000003,"left":-69.770712000000003,"top":43.739490099999998,"right":-69.770712000000003,"bottom":43.739490099999998,"geohash":"dry2u6d8bxfmt","latlon":"43.7394901,-69.770712","summary":" (207) 546-2124 \n C\/O Maine Coastal Islands National Wildlife Refuge Complex\n14 Water St\nMilbridge,\nME\n04658\n\n \n ","hours":" \u00a0 Image Details \n\u00a0\nPond Island National Wildlife Refuge is a 10-acre island in the mouth of the Kennebec River adjacent to Popham Beach.\n\u00a0\u00a0 Image Details \nPond island lighthouse was put in operation in 1821, making the hazardous entrance to the Kennebec River safer for mariners.\u00a0 The island was a transfer point for steamboat passengers traveling from Bangor to Augusta.\u00a0 In 1963 the U.S. Coast Guard automated the station and removed the buildings leaving only the lighthouse. The island was transferred from the Coast Guard to the Fish and Wildlife Service in 1973 establishing Pond Island National Wildlife Refuge.\nPond Island National Wildlife Refuge is a 10-acre island in the mouth of the Kennebec River adjacent to Popham Beach. The treeless character and grass, forb, and shrub cover provides excellent habitat for nesting seabirds. In 1996, the Service, Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, and the National Audubon Society initiated a tern restoration program on Pond Island. Image Details \nIn 1999, Pond Island produced its first tern chick in over 60 years, when 10 pairs of common terns successfully nested on the island. Since 1999 Pond Island has supported Common, Arctic and the endangered roseate terns. Common eiders also nest on the island and a variety of shorebirds, songbirds, and raptors stopover during spring and fall migration.\nThe Fish and Wildlife Service works with National Audubon Society to restore seabird populations and protect wildlife habitat on Pond Island. Each year Audubon and Refuge biologists collect information on seabird populations, food habits, productivity, and work to control predators such as great horned owls, great back-backed and herring gulls.\n ","main":true,"url":"\/refuge\/maine-coastal-islands-complex\/visit-us\/locations\/pond-island-national-wildlife-refuge"]}; About Us Image Details The Maine Coastal Islands National Wildlife Refuge contains more than 73 offshore islands and four coastal parcels, totaling more than 9,478 acres. The Service's primary focus at Maine Coastal Islands Refuge is restoring and managing colonies of nesting seabirds. Refuge islands provide habitat for common, Arctic, and endangered roseate terns; Atlantic puffins; razorbills; common murres; black guillemots; Leach's storm-petrels; herring, great black-backed, and laughing gulls; double-crested and great cormorants; and common eiders. Over the last 25 years, the Service has worked to reverse the decline in these birds' populations. As a result, many species have returned to islands where they nested historically.




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